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Interview with Steve Nardini (@invisiblewins)

February 21, 2019

 

 

 

 

On a cold and brisk night in New Haven (Raheem) I met up with Steve Nardini (@invisiblewins) at Archie Moore’s to get his unique perspective on hip hop culture, politics and finding the truth in any given situation. 

 

Rahisha has connected with Steve a little over a year ago shortly after she hosted an arts event produced by Revartlution that she hosted. “I have always seen Steve as a sweet innovative and endearing guy who has posted engaging content on his Instagram.”

 

“I realized months ago that he’s someone I would want to contribute to the No Starving Artists brand, and several days prior to us meeting up, I pitched this idea to him. Steve said I’m in. We started the interview via Instagram and Raheem finished it.”-Rahisha Bivens 

 

Steve is stepping into his role as a contributor for No Starving Artists. He will contribute articles that have anything to do with hip hop tracks to politics to art. We are happy to have him come aboard.

 

Rahisha: How did you come up with the name Invisible Wins?

Steve: I want to say it was a product of seeing people bragging and showing off on social and in everyday conversations, invisible wins would be spiritual wins, creating connections, leveling up artistically, things that aren’t necessarily highlighted as achievements by the masses. 

 

Rahisha: I like that. 

 

Steve: Thank you! It sounded nice when it came to me. Catchy in a way.

 

Rahisha: What are some of the things you’d like to highlight that aren’t normally highlighted? 

 

Steve: I think there’s too much of a tribe mentality in our current climate. Meaning people are extremely dedicated to “their side” and “their people” while simultaneously preaching acceptance and progression... I don’t believe this is how we will survive these times.

 

Rahisha: Hmm. How do you think we can survive these times? What’s the key? In your mind?

 

Steve: Relinquish control. Express yourself, but allow things to just happen if you are not in a position to change them directly. Open conversations are a huge piece.

 

(Now we transition into the second part of the interview that took place at Archie Moore’s)

Raheem: What would you say is your mission statement, Steve?

Steve: I try to find the “truth” in any given situation and also the larger picture. To me finding out what’s really going on is the goal. More specifically it has to do with individual psychology and group mentality. Why does that get compromised? If you look at us individually we think similar but in a group that changes.

Raheem: What are your feelings on the current political climate?

Steve: How much space do you have on your phone? (laughs) It is a great magnifying glass to human behavior. Little to do with politics. It’s ego, pride and insecurities. Government should solve problems. Both sides have fallen into I want to be right and nothing is getting solved.
It’s a necessary train wreck that will benefit humanity down the line. Future generations could benefit but it’s a gamble after you hit rock bottom. 

Raheem: What do you enjoy about hip hop?

Steve: It’s the most truthful music/genre. Most popular and truthful. It sounds amazing. Mainstream culture will focus on certain genres like the not lyrical and shallow. Non lyrical should be observed and not judged. There’s everything from Lil Pump to Kendrick Lamar. It should be educational and not focus on the negative. Society is more inclined to be negative. There are two sides. You can’t just listen to the radio and expect to get a full picture and get a full spectrum of hip hop. Old white men judge hip hop not on its own merits.

Raheem: What are your feelings on 21 Savage?

Steve: I think he was targeted. His visa expired for 13 years and then went to jail. He talked about the wall and Flint and performed on Kimmel. Kendrick is not seen as a threat. They don’t want 21 talking about positive things. 95% of what Steve saw were jokes about him being from UK. 21 is on 23 hour lockdown. Too many memes about him being from UK. It's targeted mocking and it’s not funny.

 

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